Our Curriculum Design & Ideas

Huddleston Academy
Curriculum Design & Ideas

No matter the grade you are beginning your homeschooling journey, it can be a fun and exciting time! Our desire is to help make it as stress-less as possible! Here, you will find our personally designed curriculum. . . as well as ideas to incorporate for each grade. You may see some ideas repeated, but in efforts to keep it simple, we’ve included them for each grade applicable.

One thing you’ll notice is our curriculum is meant to link together. We are a growing family with several children close in age so it makes it easier for this homeschooling Mama to teach similar concepts with the ability to easily add to and take away as needed! We hope you enjoy our curriculum and are able to get the most from it!

Snag many of the supplies talked about below at discounted prices from Discount School Supply!


Essential School Supplies!


Toddler 2

Brief Schedule:
Since two-year-old’s have somewhat of a short attention span, it is important to keep teaching and learning time short and fun.

  • set aside 2-3 days per week (more or less if you need)
  • do focused-teaching and learning for at least 20-30 minutes (some kiddos may need more or less)
  • choose the best time of day for you and your toddler

What to teach:
Ages 2-5 are prime years for our youngn’s. Their brains are growing at rapid rates and they are taking in everything around them.

Key concepts taught/learned:

  • biblical stories, verse memorization
  • age-appropriate books
  • songs, poems, and nursery rhymes
  • personal information (first and last name)
  • animals
  • colors
  • shapes
  • introduction to alphabet
  • numbers (1-20)
  • clothing
  • body parts
  • small/gross motor skills

How to teach concepts (introduce, recognize, review, and retain):
(I recommend an IR3* kind of teaching structure. Before beginning to teach your two-year-old, make sure he/she can sit quietly for a certain amount of time.)

  • Sitting quietly. First and foremost, it is important that your child can sit quietly for a limited amount of time. This amount of time may be different for each child but it should at least be enough time for you to introduce a concept.
  • Introduce. If you can get at least 5 minutes, that is a start. Use those 5 minutes to introduce a new topic and discuss characteristics about it. For example, when introducing a circle, you could say, “This is a circle. It is round like a clock. “
  • Recognize. To help your child recognize the concept (for example, the circle), get them actively involved through pointing to the shape, painting, coloring, and/or singing about the circle. Most two-year-old’s actively learn through play, so making learning fun is another way to keep their attention.
  • Review. Reviewing a concept is key to bridging the gaps between something being taught and learned. Review should happen as much as needed in order for your child to learn a concept. Memorization is usually the main goal at this age, and that is okay because of the reiteration of the concepts over time.
  • Retain. Retaining a concept that’s taught is met when the child can identity the concept independently. For example, if you ask your child, “What shape is that?” He or she should be able to point to a shape and say its shape name. I recommend to continue reviewing (quizzing) although they may show signs of having learned a concept.

*I have not seen the term/acronym IR3 used in reference to the education field. I ask that if you use this method and/or share this method with others, please link Huddleston Academy and this blog.*

Lesson Plan ideas:
Feel free to make any necessary changes to the lesson plans to fit your homeschooling schedule. The plans I made are based on a 3 day per week, 30 minutes per day schedule. Just an idea. . . . .the 30 minutes can be broken up into 3 ten-minute blocks, or 2 fifteen-minute blocks. Information on books of the week can be found here.


Toddler 3 – Preschool

Brief Schedule:
At 3 years of age, some children may still have a short attention span. That’s okay! Just keep your teaching and learning time short and fun. Switch it up by incorporating learning in your daily activities (grocery shopping, going to the bank, post office, taking a walk, etc.).

  • set aside 3-4 days per week (more or less if you need)
  • do focused-teaching and learning for at least 30-45 minutes (some kiddos may need more or less)
  • choose the best time of day for you and your toddler

What to teach:
Ages 2-5 are prime years for our youngn’s. Their brains are growing at rapid rates and they are taking in everything around them.

Key concepts taught/learned:

  • biblical stories, verse memorization
  • age-appropriate books
  • songs, poems, and nursery rhymes
  • personal information (first and last name)
  • animals
  • colors (primary/secondary, mixing, etc.)
  • shapes
  • senses
  • opposites
  • upper and lowercase letters
  • letter sounds (phonetics)
  • numbers (1-100)
  • body parts
  • small/gross motor skills
  • self-help/care skills

How to teach concepts (introduce, recognize, review, and retain):
(I recommend an IR3* kind of teaching structure. Before beginning to teach your two-year-old, make sure he/she can sit quietly for a certain amount of time.)

  • Sitting quietly. First and foremost, it is important that your child can sit quietly for a limited amount of time. This amount of time may be different for each child but it should at least be enough time for you to introduce a concept.
  • Introduce. If you can get at least 10 minutes, that is a start. Use those 10 minutes to introduce a new topic and discuss characteristics about it. For example, when introducing a circle, you could say, “This is a circle. It is round like a clock. “
  • Recognize. To help your child recognize the concept (for example, the circle), get them actively involved through pointing to the shape, painting, coloring, and/or singing about the circle. Most three-year-old’s actively learn through play, so making learning fun is another way to keep their attention.
  • Review. Reviewing a concept is key to bridging the gaps between something being taught and learned. Review should happen as much as needed in order for your child to learn a concept. Memorization is usually the main goal at this age, and that is okay because of the reiteration of the concepts over time.
  • Retain. Retaining a concept that’s taught is met when the child can identity the concept independently. For example, if you ask your child, “What shape is that?” He or she should be able to point to a shape and say its shape name. I recommend to continue reviewing (quizzing) although they may show signs of having learned a concept.

*I have not seen the term/acronym IR3 used in reference to the education field. I ask that if you use this method and/or share this method with others, please link Huddleston Academy and this blog.*


Lesson Plan ideas:
Feel free to make any necessary changes to the following plans to fit your homeschooling schedule. These plans are based on a 4 day per week, 45 minutes per day schedule. Just an idea. . . . .the 45 minutes can be broken up into 3 fifteen-minute blocks, or 2 twenty-minute blocks. Information on books of the week can be found here.

This curriculum is almost identical to our 2-year-old curriculum because we want to reiterate concepts taught and build on them. While they may look exactly alike, pay close attention to the added detail of concepts and layers being built upon the foundation laid at 2-years-old. If you are starting here, that’s okay. You should feel comfortable teaching these concepts and your toddler should be able to pick right up!😀

This also comes in handy if you are teaching children close in age and grade. No need to get bogged down with trying to teach from two different themes or curricula – just merge the two and increase the difficulty level as needed.

Suggested supplies for Toddler 3’s:

Handwriting Notebook:
– 2″ binder
– clear protectors
– dry erase markers (fat tip, thin tip, or both)
– Alphabet printables (upper and lowercase)
– Number printables
* use the above supplies to make a reusable tracing binder for children to get practice on seeing, hearing, and tracing letters and numbers. links to the printables can be found at the bottom of this page.

Letters/Shapes/Color Recognition:
– muffin pan
– ice trays (at least 2 or 3)
– metal baking sheet (small or medium)
*use the above supplies to make magnetic letter recognition and matching activities (muffin pan and baking sheet), and shape/color sorting activities (ice trays). links to see pictures of what these look like can be found at the bottom of this page.

Number counting beyond 20:
– number chart to at least 50 (most go to 100)
– small circle or square cut out of cardstock paper, laminate it
– apply small Velcro rounds to chart and circle/square counter piece
– pointer stick (if you don’t want to do Velcro pieces)
(I recommend counting on the number chart daily. Usually works well to sing alphabet song both saying the letters, then again using phonetic sounds. Then count on number chart, go over colors, and then shapes.)

Journaling:
– notebook (the beginner writing lines)
– crayons, pencils, markers, etc.
*Use the journal to start, develop, and practice early literacy skills. Great conversation starters! Use everyday situations as journal prompts.

 


Kindergarten

Brief Schedule:
(Around four-years-old, the attention span of a child is beginning to increase. It still may be short for some, but that’s okay! Just keep your teaching and learning time steady, consistent and fun. Switch it up by incorporating learning in your daily activities (grocery shopping, going to the bank, post office, taking a walk, etc.)) Here are some tips to consider:

  • set aside at least 4 days per week (more or less if you need)
  • do focused-teaching and learning for at least 45 minutes (some kiddos may need more or less to start and gradually work towards longer times)
  • choose the best time of day for you and your kindergartner

What to teach:
(Ages 2-5 are prime years for our youngn’s. Their brains are growing at rapid rates and they are taking in everything around them.)

Key concepts taught/learned:

  • biblical stories, verse memorization
  • age-appropriate books
  • songs, poems, and nursery rhymes
  • personal information (first and last name)
  • information about family
  • animals
  • colors (primary/secondary, mixing, etc.)
  • shapes
  • senses
  • opposites
  • upper and lowercase letters
  • sight words
  • letter sounds (phonetics)
  • numbers (1-100)
  • number sense (simple math)
  • body parts
  • small/gross motor skills
  • self-help/care skills

How to teach concepts (introduce, recognize, review, and retain):
(I recommend an IR3* kind of teaching structure. Before beginning to teach your two-year-old, make sure he/she can sit quietly for a certain amount of time.)

  • Sitting quietly. First and foremost, it is important that your child can sit quietly for a limited amount of time. This amount of time may be different for each child but it should at least be enough time for you to introduce a concept.
  • Introduce. If you can get at least 20 minutes, that is a start. Use those 20 minutes to introduce a new topic and discuss characteristics about it. For example, when introducing a circle, you could say, “This is a circle. It is round like a clock. “
  • Recognize. To help your child recognize the concept (for example, the circle), get them actively involved through pointing to the shape, painting, coloring, and/or singing about the circle. Most three-year-old’s actively learn through play, so making learning fun is another way to keep their attention.
  • Review. Reviewing a concept is key to bridging the gaps between something being taught and learned. Review should happen as much as needed in order for your child to learn a concept. Memorization is usually the main goal at this age, and that is okay because of the reiteration of the concepts over time.
  • Retain. Retaining a concept that’s taught is met when the child can identity the concept independently. For example, if you ask your child, “What shape is that?” He or she should be able to point to a shape and say its shape name. I recommend to continue reviewing (quizzing) although they may show signs of having learned a concept.

*I have not seen the term/acronym IR3 used in reference to the education field. I ask that if you use this method and/or share this method with others, please link Huddleston Academy and this blog.*

Lesson Plan ideas:
Feel free to make any necessary changes to the following plans to fit your homeschool schedule. The plans below are based on a 4 day per week, 1 1/2 – 2 hours per day schedule (with breaks, recess, etc. included). Just an idea. . . . .the 1 1/2 to 2 hours can be broken up into 3 thirty-minute blocks, or 2 forty-five-minute blocks.

In some ways, this curriculum is almost identical to our 2-year-old and 3-year-old curriculum because we want to reiterate concepts taught and build on them. While they may look alike, pay close attention to the added detail of concepts and layers being built upon the foundation laid at 2 and 3-years-old. If you are starting here, that’s okay. You should feel comfortable teaching these concepts and your kindergartner should be able to pick right up!😀

This also comes in handy if you are teaching children close in age and grade. No need to get bogged down with trying to teach from two different themes or curricula – just merge the two and increase the difficulty level as needed.

Suggested supplies for kindergartners:

Handwriting Notebook:
– 2″ binder
– clear protectors
– dry erase markers (fat tip, thin tip, or both)
– Alphabet printables (upper and lowercase)
– Number printables
* use the above supplies to make a reusable tracing binder for children to get practice on seeing, hearing, and tracing letters and numbers. links to the printables can be found at the bottom of this page.

Letters/Shapes/Colors Recognition:
– muffin pan
– ice trays (at least 2 or 3)
– metal baking sheet (small or medium)
*use the above supplies to make magnetic letter recognition and matching activities (muffin pan and baking sheet), and shape/color sorting activities (ice trays). links to see pictures of what these look like can be found at the bottom of this page.

Number counting beyond 20:
– number chart to at least 50 (most go to 100)
– small circle or square cut out of cardstock paper, laminate it
– apply small Velcro rounds to chart and circle/square counter piece
– pointer stick (if you don’t want to do Velcro pieces)
(I recommend counting on the number chart daily. Usually works well to sing alphabet song both saying the letters, then again using phonetic sounds. Then count on number chart, go over colors, and then shapes.)

Journaling:
– notebook (the beginner writing lines)
– crayons, pencils, markers, etc.
*Use the journal to start, develop, and practice early literacy skills. Great conversation starters! Use everyday situations as journal prompts.

For Experiments:
– cotton balls
– Q-tips
– microscope and slides
– jars or clear plastic containers
– nature (rocks, leaves, dirt, pine cones, sand, etc.)
– seeds
– plastic tweezers
– food coloring
– flour, corn starch, baking powder, etc.
– toilet paper and paper towel rolls
*These materials (and more) can be used to do all sorts of experiments! I recommend keeping these (and others that you know of) on hand. Keep them tucked away in a storage bin and that way you’ll always have them when needed!


Do you have a particular curriculum design and/or ideas you’d like to share? Let us know!

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