Faith, Family, Spiritual

5 Things Torah Observant Believers Wish Others Would Stop Saying to Them

Being three years into our walk as a Torah Observant believing family, you would think we would be able to dodge much of what is dished our way because of our beliefs. Many who have started on this journey before us warned of the speed bumps that would come… and they were right.

I have found that many people simply do not understand what it means to be Torah Observant, let alone, what Torah even means. On the contrary, there seems to be almost just as many who are familiar with it, but from an [unknowingly] anti-Semitic way.

The word Torah comes from the Hebrew word that means “instruction, teaching, or law” – law being the word that trips everyone up and has them running for the hills. However, with the proper contextual understanding, one can accept and implement Torah in their lives, and spiritual walk, today.

Without getting into the details of physical Israel versus spiritual Israel, it should be known and understood that once you are grafted in, you then adopt the ways and beliefs of the Creator who established what a child of His looks and acts like. This is where the instructions of the Torah come into play. On one hand, they were meant to show that the Israelites needed a Savior and an understanding of what their purpose in life was. On the other hand, Yahweh’s instructions were meant to bless, benefit, and guide the people (just like they do today).

So, what are 5 things Torah Observant believers wish others would stop saying to them?

1. You are putting yourself under the law!

This is most always the first thing said to a Torah Observant believer, and goes hand-in-hand with, “You’re working for your salvation!” And its understood why. When mainstream Christianity constantly and consistently preaches that “the law was done away with and nailed to the cross”, one begins to see anything contrary through that skewed lens. I was there, and would quote that in a heartbeat, not knowing what I was actually saying. For the Torah Observant believer, there is an awakening shared and Scriptural understanding unlocked about what the word law actually means. The instructions given in the Torah are clear cut with nothing hidden, and everything well-explained. For example, there are instructions specifically for men, others specifically for women… or if you are a farmer… and so on. All 613 commandments are not for every single person.

It is equivalent to today’s “law of the land”. If you do not own a business, then you are not “under the laws” that are required for business owners. If you do not drive, you are not “under the laws” mandated specifically for those who operate a motor vehicle. Needless to say, once there is an understanding of Yahweh’s laws, and how they apply to you, you genuinely see the blessings, benefits, and guidance of honoring them.

2. Are you trying to be Jewish?

How often have you heard that one?! This is in running for first place as another thing most said to Torah Observant believers. And it again, it’s no wonder why! Be honest with yourself. How often have you heard a preacher or teacher refer to anything of the Old Testament as “stuff for the Jews”? Probably a lot. When people begin hearing about the practices and livelihood from those of the days of old, it is most always related to Jews.

Here’s the most important point left out – Jews are just a representation of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Jews are from the tribe of Judah. Just like an American is from America, or a Chinese person is from China. Jews just so happened to be a collective tribe who still carries out the instructions of Torah. Yes, with many things added, but the additions added by the Rabbis, Talmud, etc. are not adopted by all who call themselves a Torah Observant believer.

3. You are creating division!

Not saying that every Torah Observant believer has a free pass, but others who haven’t come to the knowledge of Torah don’t quite understand the overwhelming emotions that come with the “awakening”, so to speak. We go through feelings of anger, confusion from lies taught, and aggressive passion of wanting to alert everyone we know. With that comes a flying sword of misunderstood words, and misplaced emotions.

Most Torah Observant believers go through a season of what appears to be “condemning” those who don’t get it, but in all actuality, that’s what we want… is for others to have the eyes to see and the ears to hear. Not division. Not harm. And definitely not a loss in witness!

4. You don’t have to do “all that”!

“All that” doesn’t make sense to the person who is not observing Torah. But for the Torah Observant believer, “all that” doesn’t really consist of all that much. The biggest differences between a Christian and a Torah Observant believer are:

  • replacement of man-made, traditional holidays for Biblical feast days (Leviticus 23)
  • replacement of an unhealthy diet for the Levitical (clean eating) diet (Leviticus 11)
  • replacement of Sunday worship for Biblical seventh day Sabbath worship (4th Commandment)
  • addition of wearing tzitzits (fringes added to four corners of clothing) as commanded in Number 15:38-40

Beyond these main differences are smaller ones that require understanding of what instructions apply to you and which do not. The instructions laid out for women, are for women. Those laid out for men, are for men. And so on. It’s not difficult, and definitely not burdensome!

5. You don’t have to use Hebraic names!

Again, for the Torah Observant believer, this is important… to the point where some will no longer use transliterated names (God, Jesus, Holy Spirit), terminology, and so on – and instead use Yahweh (YHWH), Yeshua, and Ruach HaKodesh. Even then, there are various ways of pronouncing and spelling those. However, some Torah Observant believers still continue to use the transliterated names of God, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Either way, when it comes down to it, it’s the heart of the matter.

The argument most Torah Observant believers have with proper name usage comes from a place of respect for the Creator. For example, if you were given a certain name at birth, you would want to be called that name. Now some would beg to differ and say, “my name always gets messed up or mispronounced and I’m okay with that”. For others, that is not okay.

There is also the understanding that a transliteration doesn’t have to replace an original language. After researching, it didn’t take long to realize that there is no way possible that our Messiah’s name could have been anything close to Jesus. The Hebrew language doesn’t have a J. And when looking at the original Hebrew characters (without vowel points), you actually sound out something that is even a little different than Yeshua! Simply put, our Messiah was name ישוע (yod, sheen, vav/waw/, ayin).

So next time you approach a Torah Observant believer…

Try to extend grace, love, and understanding for where they are in their walk. We don’t have all the answers, and we haven’t “arrived” because of our belief that Torah still applies to our spiritual walks today… but best believe there is some hardcore passion driving us!

And if you come across one who is angry, explosive, and immature – perhaps you may want to steer clear of any “religious talk”. I do apologize on behalf of anyone you have encountered like that because, indeed, that is not the character of our Messiah. In the same breath, I pray for all Torah Observant believers to truly embrace humility, gentleness, and wisdom when given the opportunity to share the gospel of Torah being a full of blessings, benefits, and guidance from our loving Heavenly Father!

 

Chime in! If you are a Torah Observant believer, what are some things you wish others would stop saying to you? Leave your thoughts in the comments section below!

 

Until next time, blessings!

Interested in reading more from the series of 5 Things _________ Wish Others Would Stop Saying to Them. Check out:

32 thoughts on “5 Things Torah Observant Believers Wish Others Would Stop Saying to Them”

  1. Well written, Michelle. Nowadays, when I am asked about my faith or why we follow Torah, I just reply that accept and follow The Way of the Messiah, and I will use the vernacular of Jesus. I tell them I accept all things that He and His taught ones, emissaries and Apostles accepted and observed during the First Century. I eat as He ate, worship as he worshipped, celebrate the feasts that he celebrated, prayed as He prayed, etc. When I asked why I don’t eat pork, I reply simply that, “I’m on the Jesus diet.” Or why I worship on Shabbat, “I’m on the Jesus worship schedule.” That way, it’s not inflammatory, and leaves open the opportunity that the one asking may consider my answer and want more information that allows me to engage in a way that that Good News, through the Spirit of Truth, can be shared.

    1. I am definitely going to adopt some of the things you said! I find it difficult to explain to people, but I like the way you said “Jesus diet” and “Jesus worship schedule”!! I can only imagine the doors that will open up! Thanks for sharing!!

    2. I love that, what a wonderful way to respond. As a new Torah observant believer coming from Seventh-day Adventism, where my brethren keep the Sabbath and exceed the dietary laws of Leviticus 11 being vegetarian, I find it really challenging that they identify themselves as “the people of the Book” but refuse to acknowledge all of the Book, identify the papacy/RCC as antichrist system/beast and refuse to keep her false pagan Sunday, but still celebrate her false Christmas/Easter holidays and completely ignore Leviticus 23. Thank you and God bless you.l

  2. I love the article but it’s very hard to read- the black on the gray background. I tried to go into your page , but it brought me right back again. Any way to get this in Word form on white ?

    1. Yes ma’am, I’ll email that to you. You’re the second person that’s mentioned visual issues which is weird because our website it supposed to have a white background with black letters. :/ Gotta check that out! Shalom!

  3. I love this article. I’ve been listening to a Messianic podcast from my old church with Miles Weiss for I think 5 years? I’ve learned so much and always want to learn more.

    I tell people I don’t believe there’s supposed to be such a hard split between “Christianity and Messianic Judaism. It makes me sad and I always want to discuss more with people but get shut down and crazy looks.

    I had one friend who went from a Christian upbringing to Torah observant Messianic Judaism. I was so excited for him when we re-connected and told him so. I was sad to see how shocked he was and how much he didn’t want to answer any questions I had as someone who was VERY supportive and curious in the best way. Seems as though he avoids those conversations for these same reasons.

    That bums me out, because if we can’t have open, loving, supportive conversations , how can we be one body?

    I’ve also tried to email the people at the podcast since I trust them, about questions, but I never hear back….

    When people say I shouldn’t be looking “so hard” into the “jewish roots” of my faith, I ask why not and remind them Yeshua was, in fact, extremely Jewish. Lol I remind them that while I may not have a majority it Mexican blood, I’m always learning about my husband’s culture and learning Spanish. No one seems to care about that. Why can’t I do the same with a Yeshua? I don’t know… it drives me nuts though!

    I’m glad you’ve got this out in the open for conversation and consideration!

    1. Jill, it warms my heart that you responded to my post! So many people are turned off at the word “Torah” and instantly think it involved denouncing what is considered the “Christian faith” and everything with it. When in fact, it’s complete opposite (at least for most of us). I absolutely love learning more and more about the ways of Yeshua and how He lived. I also understand that there are things we can’t depict correctly, but it’s all part of the learning process. Thank you for being so kind and I pray blessings over you and your household! <3

    2. Shalom-nice article-It’s always nice to teach people who have been grafted into the tree-share the name removed from the Bible-that early believers prayed in-etc… check out eliyah.com This is my teacher ✌️N❤️

    3. You: “I tell people I don’t believe there’s supposed to be such a hard split between Christianity and Messianic Judaism. It makes me sad and I always want to discuss more with people but get shut down and crazy looks.”

      My Response: I know, I don’t like such abrasive division. I wish there wasn’t so much resistance and opposition coming from mainstream Christianity. I try to discuss Torah observance (gently, kindly, and respectfully) but am often met with insults, mockery, mean looks, and being shut down or told to “drop it”.

  4. It is such a comfort to read about others who have come through that season of anger or frustration after realizing that Yeshua did uphold and teach Torah to his disciples. There is a common thread which ties us together although we have never met. Thank you for this well written article.

  5. I’m new to the understanding of Torah observance but I really do respect your faith. I get some heat for living what people consider “legalistic” but I say as long as it is bringing me closer to my Lord and Savior why should it be a problem? I’ve changed a lot of things in my walk with the Redeemer and I will lead where he follows. So thank you for being true to where Christ has called you!

    1. I totally understand, and thank you for your encouraging words. We are somewhat out of the “Y’all are legalistic and/or going back to Judaism” phase as people around us are starting to see that this isn’t some fad or New Age trend… it’s TRUTH. And just like ANY TRUTH – it HOLDS! XO Hand in there my sweet sister. Do not look to the right or to the left… but listen for the voice of the Father who says, “This is the way, walk in it.”

  6. I am now one year learning to live a Torah lifestyle. Thank you for your article and thanks to those who commented, there is so much to learn. All of you have blessed me today. Shalom.

  7. I’m having a hard time transitioning into this. I’m a pastor’s wife. Our whole family, on both sides (his and mine) have celebrated Christmas, Easter (without the bunny and now without eggs) and all the traditional American holidays that most who claim to be Christians celebrate, minus Halloween. I started head covering this past summer. When I started, I also sat in an off room from the main chapel room, where I could still see my husband preaching and the choir singing and soloists. But I felt it would be best to sit away from the gaze of most of the congregation. It’s a small church, usually 30 or less in attendance most Sundays. Still, I did get some curious looks, but no one said anything. I did take off my covering after getting home from church and put it back on when praying during my devotional time as well as when cooking or baking (it’s better than hair nets at keeping hair out of food). But I don’t know how to approach the subject of changing our eating and dropping traditional holidays for true biblical ones. I feel that to make that transition, I would need the support of similarly convicted sisters and brothers in Christ. As a result, I’ve been lax on wearing dresses and skirts all the time (I always did that when assembling at church or church events already) and using head covering. This is leaving me very disquieted in my soul. I need support!

  8. Do you sleep apart from your husband and avoid touching him when you menstruate? No one seems to talk about these aspects of the law, so I don’t know if women are following it. The Torah lists multiple times that I, as a woman, would be unclean. Are those still in effect?

    Please note: I am a skeptic of Torah Observance. I say this because I feel it would be dishonest to not disclose it. I am not trying to trap you, but when I read the Law, I see so many (non-Temple) laws that are not being followed and I cannot understand why, if we are to keep the Law, that some laws are pushed to the side or not discussed at all.

    If you could help clear this up from your perspective, I would be grateful.

    Thank you so much for reading. God Bless.

    1. Thank you for your question Angela. I will do my best to explain. When Scripture speaks of “lie with a woman” it is not speaking of physically laying in a bed next to her. It is speaking of having sexual relations with a woman. This instruction (also translated law) is also part of a bigger list that is all wrapped up in what makes a woman and/or a man unclean when it comes to bodily emissions. Yes, we are unclean during our cycle but not in a negative sense versus more of a protective sense. Just like a pig is unclean to eat; however, it doesn’t make the animal itself bad (in fact, we need them to help keep environments clean). So, no, I do not sleep apart from my husband during my cycle. We simply abstain from sexual intercourse for the mandated 7 days that I am considered unclean. Let me know if you have any more questions! XO

      1. Leviticus 15:19 onward says that even touching a menstruating woman, her bed clothes or even the chair she sits on will make you unclean and the person who touches her will be unclean until nightfall. I assume ceremonial means simply that, were the Temple still here, that you would be unclean for Temple, but that there is no prohibition in touching a menstruating person?

        It’s funny how just “talking” it out with someone patient enough to listen (or read!) makes it so much easier to grasp. Thank you for being my sounding board on this and for being so gracious in your reply!

        1. I know what you mean. I honestly do not have the understanding of the breakdown of the verses that speak of not even touching a woman who has an emission of blood. I have seen many explanations from them having different supplies during that time (whereas we have pads, tampons, etc.) to the more Orthodox end of it being seen as bad as worshiping a false idol. In moments like these I always direct people to pray and earnestly seek what the Father would have them do. We personally do not abstain from touching and/or sitting on the same pieces of furniture.

  9. Nice article

    Yes, I’ve experienced some controversy with my decision to be a Torah keeper. I’ve went through times of sadness, confusion and anger myself. I haven’t experienced exactly what you wrote but stuff similar enough to it.

  10. This is helpful. I wanted something to have, where I can show my husband and family about some changes I will be making in my new observance of Torah, such as diet, sunday worship, etc. I was looking for an easy list to show, so they understood, in a nutshell, even though they aren’t following, just yet. It would be helpful for something like this, to quickly show differences between this and Christianity. My husband and kids feel I am going into a cult and over-reacting about pagan holidays. Thank you for this.

  11. At a young age, I was an atheist and always questioned the belief of Christians that most Biblical Law was abolished. In my freshman year of high school, I became a follower of Yeshua. I did as many mainstream Christians do… celebrate Christmas, Easter, worship on Sunday, and not obey God’s Law. But, soon I heard of Torah observant believers. At first, I felt as though I was expected (by family, church, school, etc) to mock them and affirm “the Torah is done away with” despite my hesitation to do so. Yet, my suspicion pushed me to study of Scripture and the history of the Biblical faith. At the age of 18, I am now an “unofficial” (my family expects and requires me to believe and act as they do and try to convince me to “drop this”) Torah-observant believer in Yeshua. Sadly, when I tried to point out to my family that the Scriptures do not say “the Torah is abolished”, they said I’m legalistic, “not accepting freedom in Jesus”, “you’re being a Pharisee”, “you can’t do what is only for the Jews, biblically and culturally (“it’s cultural appropriation”) it’s wrong”. My mom said I shouldn’t listen to Torah-observers and “you need to drop this nonsense, people will mock you and laugh at you because what you are saying is ridiculous”. WHAT SHOULD I DO? I can’t leave the church until I go to college and if I visit my family, they may forcefully insist that I stay in the church. I am also concerned, with my stubbornness, they may treat me. Nobody in my family will be okay with this.

    1. EDIT: my stubbornness, they may treat me differently (they have been unkind and angry at me before over my other issues so this may make things worse).

    2. Hey Jael. This is indeed a tough spot; however, your faith in the Messiah and willingness to actually walk as He walked far outweighs was man tries to get us to do that goes against Yah’s Word. As a mother, if I had a teenage child who did have the beliefs his/her father and I instilled in him/her, then I would have to let them go. I believe I understand that for your family, it’s too much for them to understand and don’t want to leave you alone about it. Hang tight, your way of escape is coming. We are praying for you. Stay strong.

  12. I am so grateful to see a community of Torah observant believers. Someone asked if I were a Jew, and after considering such a loaded question, my response was ABSOLUTELY! According to Paul, true Jews are those circumcised in the HEART, and not the flesh (Rom. 2:29). Those who desire to obey Adonai and follow HIS TORAH. I can say like David, in HIS LAW is my delight. I will say that it’s not an easy transition. Roman Christendom has really taken from the original Apostolic Faith. I dont know if someone inspired you all, but this is something the FATHER has been downloading into my Spirit. Praise HIM!

  13. It is a blessing to have found your blog this Sabbath morning. I am a Seventh-day Adventist who has just recently been led to see many of the deceptions we as Christians have been under. It is shocking, and I likewise want to share this amazing revelation with everyone I know in the church, but they do not want to hear it. I was only led to the Sabbath three years ago, although I was already mostly vegetarian before then and had stopped celebrating Christmas and Easter. It is only in the past few months that I have come to see God’s feasts as having anything to do with us, and the revelation of their significance is profound. God is so amazing how He just keeps revealing more of Himself and His Word, if we diligently seek after Him with all our hearts. I spend hours now listening to 119 Ministries, who I have learned so much from, and love because, unlike mainstream Christian ministries, they do not claim to have all the answers or understanding, but in fact have significantly more. God bless you, and I look forward to reading more of your posts.

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